Williams Allegro 88-Key Digital Piano Review

Nina Fenton April 22, 2014 0
  • Sound quality
  • Product quality
  • Playability
  • Price

I had been shopping around for a new digital keyboard for a while and I came across the Williams Allegro in my local music store. I figured the price was right in my ballpark and it couldn’t hurt to give it a shot. I really was not that impressed with this piano once I got it home, set up and played around with it. It is not completely without any pluses in the pro’s column, but there definitely were more con’s unfortunately. Let’s go ahead and dive right into the details of this keyboard so you can decide if it is right for you.

The Williams Allegro is really as basic as basic can get in terms of a digital keyboard. There aren’t any super special bells and whistles on it, which is fine since in this case you are truly getting what you pay for. Take a quick peek at what the piano has to offer.

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Williams Allegro 88-Key Digital Piano Features and Specifications

  • 88 touch sensitive, hammer action, velocity sensitive keys
  • 64 note polyphony
  • 8 piano and keyboard sounds (piano 1, piano 2, electric piano , electric piano 2, church organ, rock/jazz organ, strings, upright bass)
  • Demo songs corresponding to each voice
  • Reverb and chorus effects metronome feature with variable tempo to facilitate practice or recording
  • Two track recorder allowing song recording and playback
  • Headphone jack allows silent practice mode
  • MIDI in/out connections
  • Stereo/mono line outputs
  • External DC power supply unit
  • Sustain pedal
  • Music rest
  • User manual

Our Review

[easyazon_block add_to_cart=”default” align=”right” asin=”B0049SBVLG” cloaking=”default” layout=”top” localization=”default” locale=”US” nofollow=”default” new_window=”default” tag=”ragtimedigital-20″]One of the first things that I noticed upon setting up this piano is how basic and nondescript it is. There isn’t anything particularly special that makes it stand out or seem extra appealing to the eye. There is a distinct lack of fanfare as it only comes in black and with an unimpressive finish. It does have the company’s “W” and “M” logo on it to give it a slight touch of character. I was kind of surprised by how big and awkward it is and found it very hard to reposition and move from one spot to another. This is definitely not a digital piano for a traveling artist as it is really heavy and rather cumbersome. I find the size a bit of an issue since it is being presented as a portable piano, but it would really only be convenient to cart it around if you were doing so with a crane.

The Williams Allegro is pretty easy to use and has a nice, user friendly instruction manual. For the most part you are able to plug in the piano, program and go about your merry way and play. The only program or button related issue I had was that there are a lot of sub categories to choose from when programming the sound. This can be a bit confusing and daunting to many users that just want to plug it in and play.

The piano does have an 88 key; touch sensitive hammer action keyboards with weighted keys. This is definitely a plus since there are many digital pianos with only 45-60 keys and no hammer action. The keyboard portion of the piano does respond pretty quickly when being played and the keys don’t seem to be super sticky.  I do however wish that the keys themselves were graded or scaled. That would provide a bit more of a realistic sound and would likely make for a happier buyer.  One issue that I encountered was with the key velocity. When pressing the keys at the same intensity, the keys would sound at varying velocities. Nothing makes a song sound off kilter like inconsistent key velocity. I did find out that Williams is aware of this issue and in the process of creating some sort of firmware to fix this issue, but that doesn’t really help me or other users in the interim.

There are 8 piano and keyboard sounds available on the Williams Allegro digital piano. To be totally honest, I found that the only useable options to be the piano 1 and piano 2 features. The piano 1 and 2 option does sound pretty good and really close to the real thing emitting a nice acoustic piano sound. However, the church organ, rock/jazz organ, strings, upright bass sound fake, pitchy, flat and unrealistic at best.

The speakers on the piano are pretty small and emit very low sound. I cranked the volume up to high and was still struggling to hear it adequately. Along with low volume, there is definitely a lot to be desired in terms of sound quality too. I found that it sounded very tin like and scratchy almost. This is a pretty big issue since it will affect how you play and what others hear as well. I’m not really sure what would fix this issue, but it was a big enough issue that I actually have considered returning it for another piano.

Another issue I ran into when I was playing with the Williams Allegro was that the sustain pedal is not very good. What I mean by this is that it requires you to put pressure on random spots to get it to work properly and you have to really step on it hard, nearly stomp on it in my case. After I encountered this issue I did a bit of researching and found that the pedal is also prone to cease functioning frequently, so there is the possibility that you may be mid show and your pedal will go out on you for good. Luckily, you can preempt this potential issue by just replacing it right away with a pedal of your choosing.

Final Thoughts…

All in all, the main draw to the Williams Allegro 88 Key Digital Piano is the price. It comes in at $299 and while I wouldn’t exactly call it a steal, it is a good deal if you are looking for a very basic digital piano. While it does not come with any bells or whistles and has a few snags here and there, you are getting a digital piano that does what it’s intended to do. I hope this little review will be helpful when you are considering purchasing a new digital piano!

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